Salary History of Current & Past NHL Players
(1989 -  2008)
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Stats of Current and Past Players
 (pro/minor/amateur)
Enter last name and click on "Search" to access hockeydb.com's database

Friday, October 23, 2009

Gretzky & Lemieux Born 10 Years Too Soon!

HockeyZonePlus.com has updated its unique NHL salary history database to include 2009-2010. It is interesting to note where Wayne Gretzky and Mario Lemieux rank in the overall fortunes accumulated playing in the NHL: While Jaromir Jagr is still on top, with nearly $100M, Lemieux is 40th with $48,926,829 while Gretzky is 65th with $40,521,616. Talk about being born 10 years too soon! Not that it would change the lifestyle that much, mind you.

Overall, 30 players have accumulated more than $50M while 151 accumulated more than $25M (if Glen Wesley can make a comeback long enough to justify a $5,000 payckeck, that would make it 152.)

Sergei Fedorov has made $65,519,036 but apparently managed to "invest" and lose most of it.

The Small Print: Figures in US$. Salaries paid in Canadian currency by Canadian teams, in the early 90s, were converted to $US as per the January exchange rate of the given seasons. Some players have two-way contracts and have received lower salaries than those listed when playing in farm clubs. The listed salaries were gathered from different sources and while they closely reflect reality, they are not necessarily exact. Of course, that is from their NHL salaries only and it does not take into account any other revenue streams such as endorsements, summer jobs, business ventures, being a Mary Kay independent consultant to supplement revenues, etc. Base salaries are usually shown as bonuses are generally not made public. Totals do take into account the fact that players received only +/-58% of their salary during the 1994-95 season because of a strike (48 games played instead of 84). Some players possibly had contracts stipulating that they were paid despite a strike but we have no information in that regard. During the 2004-05 lockout, some players joined various teams in North America and Europe and were paid to do so. It is not included in the Grand Total because we have no information about the salaries they made in those leagues. Figures shown represent earnings; investment results may vary - ask Sergei Fedorov. Still reading? How is your 401k/RSSP doing?

Photo credit: Flickr/Joits

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Brodeur Leads Top 10 NHL Goalie Fortunes with $62M

HockeyZonePlus.com has updated its unique NHL salary history database to include 2009-2010.

Top Ten Accumulated Fortunes by Goalies:

  1. Martin Brodeur ($62,653,018)
  2. Patrick Roy ($56,771,988)
  3. Dominik Hasek ($55,942,300)
  4. Curtis Joseph ($51,438,000)
  5. Ed Belfour ($49,633,000)
  6. Nikolai Khabibulin ($46,356,518)
  7. Olaf Kolzig ($43,810,000)
  8. Mike Richter ($43,620,000)
  9. Jose Theodore ($39,619,968)
  10. Roberto Luongo ($35,532,500)
The Small Print: Figures in US$. Salaries paid in Canadian currency by Canadian teams, in the early 90s, were converted to $US as per the January exchange rate of the given seasons. Some players have two-way contracts and have received lower salaries than those listed when playing in farm clubs. The listed salaries were gathered from different sources and while they closely reflect reality, they are not necessarily exact. Of course, that is from their NHL salaries only and it does not take into account any other revenue streams such as endorsements, summer jobs, business ventures, being a Mary Kay independent consultant to supplement revenues, etc. Base salaries are usually shown as bonuses are generally not made public. Totals do take into account the fact that players received only +/-58% of their salary during the 1994-95 season because of a strike (48 games played instead of 84). Some players possibly had contracts stipulating that they were paid despite a strike but we have no information in that regard. During the 2004-05 lockout, some players joined various teams in North America and Europe and were paid to do so. It is not included in the Grand Total because we have no information about the salaries they made in those leagues. Figures shown represent earnings; investment results may vary - ask Sergei Fedorov. Still reading? How is your 401k/RSSP doing?

Photo credit: Flickr/Patxi64

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Jagr Leads Top 10 NHL Fortunes with $98M

HockeyZonePlus.com has updated its unique NHL salary history database to include 2009-2010.

Top Ten Accumulated Fortunes:

  1. Jaromir Jagr ($ 98,038,851)
  2. Joe Sakic ($93,174,047)
  3. Nicklas Lidstrom ($87,965,000)
  4. Paul Kariya ($82,686,100)
  5. Keith Tkachuk ($80,498,674)
  6. Rob Blake ($80,487,982)
  7. Mats Sundin ($79,669,132)
  8. Chris Pronger ($78,700,500)
  9. Mike Modano ($74,587,650)
  10. Pavel Bure ($66,369,794)
The Small Print: Figures in US$. Salaries paid in Canadian currency by Canadian teams, in the early 90s, were converted to $US as per the January exchange rate of the given seasons. Some players have two-way contracts and have received lower salaries than those listed when playing in farm clubs. The listed salaries were gathered from different sources and while they closely reflect reality, they are not necessarily exact. Of course, that is from their NHL salaries only and it does not take into account any other revenue streams such as endorsements, summer jobs, business ventures, being a Mary Kay independent consultant to supplement revenues, etc. Base salaries are usually shown as bonuses are generally not made public. Totals do take into account the fact that players received only +/-58% of their salary during the 1994-95 season because of a strike (48 games played instead of 84). Some players possibly had contracts stipulating that they were paid despite a strike but we have no information in that regard. During the 2004-05 lockout, some players joined various teams in North America and Europe and were paid to do so. It is not included in the Grand Total because we have no information about the salaries they made in those leagues. Figures shown represent earnings; investment results may vary - ask Sergei Fedorov. Still reading? How is your 401k/RSSP doing?

Photo credit: Flickr/CS Smith

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